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About Copper test

Copper test

₹800 ₹500

Know more about Copper test

Copper testing is primarily used to help diagnose Wilson disease, a rare inherited disorder that can lead to excess storage of copper in the liver, brain, and other organs.

Signs and symptoms may include: 

Anemia 

Nausea, abdominal pain 

Jaundice 

Fatigue 

Behavioral changes 

Tremors 

Difficulty walking and/or swallowing 

Dystonia

Testing may be ordered when a person has signs and symptoms that may be due to a copper deficiency, such as: 

Abnormally low numbers of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell (neutropenia)

Osteoporosis

Anemia

Less commonly, neurologic symptoms and delayed growth in children

Wilson's disease is an inherited gene that's passed down from parents to their children. If parents have a child with Wilson's disease, they could potentially have other children with the condition as well. 

 

Although you can't prevent Wilson's disease, you can delay or slow the onset of the condition. If you find out you have Wilson's disease early on, you may be able to prevent the symptoms from showing by taking medications like zinc. A genetic specialist can help parents determine their potential risk for passing Wilson's disease to their children. 

After the symptoms improve and your copper levels are normal, you'll want to focus on long-term maintenance therapy. This includes continuing zinc or chelating therapy and regularly monitoring your copper levels. You can also manage your copper levels by avoiding foods with high levels, such as: dried fruit liver mushrooms nuts shellfish chocolate multivitamins

The treatment is to remove excess copper from your body through chelating therapy. Chelating agents include drugs like d-penicillamine and trientine, or Syprine. These drugs will remove the extra copper from your organs and release it into the bloodstream. Your kidneys will then filter the copper into the urine. 

Test Method 1 : A 24-hour urine sample is needed. 

On day 1, urinate into the toilet when you get up in the morning. 

Afterward, collect all urine in a special container for the next 24 hours. 

On day 2, urinate into the container when you get up in the morning. 

Cap the container. Keep it in the refrigerator or a cool place during the collection period. 

Label the container with your name, the date, the time of completion, and return it as instructed. 

 

For an infant, thoroughly wash the area where urine exits the body. 

 

Open a urine collection bag (a plastic bag with an adhesive paper on one end). 

For males, place the entire penis in the bag and attach the adhesive to the skin. 

For females, place the bag over the labia. 

Diaper as usual over the secured bag. 

This procedure may take more than one try. An active infant can move the bag, so that the urine leaks into the diaper. 

 

Check the infant often and change the bag after the infant has urinated into it. 

 

Drain the urine from the bag into the container given to you by your health care provider. 

Return the bag or container as instructed. 

A laboratory specialist will determine how much copper is in the sample. 

Report available : Turn around time is 24 hours. 

A person have the following signs and symptoms should get this done: 

Anemia 

Nausea, abdominal pain 

Jaundice 

Fatigue 

Behavioral changes 

Tremors 

Difficulty walking and/or swallowing 

Dystonia

Testing may be ordered when a person has signs and symptoms that may be due to a copper deficiency, such as: 

Abnormally low numbers of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell (neutropenia)

Osteoporosis

Anemia

Less commonly, neurologic symptoms and delayed growth in children. 

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